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What China's Real Estate Market Will Look Like in Five Years – Bloomberg

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Connecting decision makers to a dynamic network of information, people and ideas, Bloomberg quickly and accurately delivers business and financial information, news and insight around the world
Americas+1 212 318 2000
EMEA+44 20 7330 7500
Asia Pacific+65 6212 1000
Romaine Bostick breaks down the day's top stories and trading action leading into the close.
Insight and analysis of top stories from our award winning magazine "Bloomberg Businessweek".
Highlights from a week-long virtual event bringing Bloomberg Businessweek magazine to life. Carol Massar and Tim Stenovec host a look back at the best interviews, discussions and more.
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With the government ending its crackdown, values will recover, but the go-go years are gone.
The Chinese government’s multiyear crackdown on its housing industry is finally coming to an end. An official statement after the latest Politburo meeting on July 24 did not include President Xi Jinping’s mantra that “housing is to be lived in, not speculated on.” The government is calling for measures to encourage home purchases and stabilize the property market.
It’s about time. The real estate industry, which accounts for roughly a quarter of China’s economy, is suffering another downturn after a brief rebound spurred by the lifting of Covid-19 lockdowns. Consumers are penny-pinching. Building starts are falling. Distressed developers are defaulting again.

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